Many Rescue Pets From the Camp Fire Still Need Loving Homes

Rescue pets from the Camp Fire still need homes!

The Camp Fire was the deadliest, most destructive wildfire in our state’s history, and it was the world’s most expensive natural disaster of 2018. In the wake of unrelenting tragedy, responders took immediate note of the area’s animal residents. Fortunately, since November, there have been many happy reunions between pets and their owners, but there are still dozens of rescue pets out there. Due to various extenuating circumstances, their owners may never be able to claim them, but that doesn’t mean these animals can stay in the shelter system indefinitely. In other words, rescue pets from the Camp Fire still need help!

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Ticket to Ride? Brush Up on Pet Travel Safety Before You Leave!

Pet travel safety is important when traveling with petsWhen it comes to making plans, it’s only natural to want to include the family pet in all the fun. However, traveling with a pet, especially during the holidays, can be challenging and stressful. It also increases the risk of illness, injury, and accidental escape.

The team at Redwood Veterinary Hospital wants to help you and your pet enjoy your time together and get as much out of life as possible. We think our pet travel safety tips are a good place to start!

First Things First

Whether you’re road tripping to Grandma’s for the weekend or heading off on a more extended vacation, your pet’s first stop should be at our hospital. A pre-travel wellness exam will ensure your pet is healthy enough for travel and that he or she is current on vaccinations and parasite prevention. Continue…

The Itchy Truth About Pet Allergies

Beagle itching with hind leg while outsideIf your pet always seems to be itching or chewing on their paws, back, or ears, they probably have pet allergies. In fact, according to pet insurance companies, pet allergies are the number one reason that pet owners seek veterinary care. Luckily, pet allergies can be diagnosed and treated. Here’s what you need to know to help your pet find relief.

The Basics of Pet Allergies

There are three main allergies that pets experience, and some have a combination of one or more. Here are the basics of each:

Flea allergies – Flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) occurs when a pet is allergic to flea saliva. Even one flea bite can trigger an allergic response that sends your pet’s immune system into chaos. Pets with this condition typically itch on the back half of their body, around the base of the tail.

Environmental pet allergies – Dust, pollen, dander and mold are environmental allergens. Allergies to these substances typically start occurring only during certain times of the year, depending on climate and what’s in bloom, but often progress into year-round symptoms. We sometimes refer to this type of allergy as Atopic Dermatitis.

Food-related pet allergies – Some pets are allergic to ingredients in pet food. Most of the allergens are protein-related, however, your pet can develop sensitivity to any of the ingredients in his or her food. Pets with food allergies typically experience itchiness all year long, and some may also show gastrointestinal signs, such as vomiting and diarrhea. Continue…

Why are Foxtails a Danger to Your Pet?

Foxtails are a threat to pet health. Exercise outdoor pet safety when hiking with pets or playing outside with pets.Foxtails… The name conjures up images of soft, fluffy plants that seem pretty harmless, right? Actually, wrong! Foxtails, rye grass, gamma grass, cheatgrass and other common members of this plant family are well known for the injuries they can inflict on pets. So, what are these formidable foes and why should your pet avoid them in the great outdoors?

Redwood Veterinary Hospital is here to help!

What are Foxtails?

Foxtails are a grass-like plant (considered a weed by many) in the genus Hordeum. As its name implies, foxtails have a fuzzy end that resembles a fox tail. This genus also includes other spikelets, like cheatgrass, barley, millet, and rye. These grasses contain a tiny barb or awn that allows them to attach to anything going by, including your pet. This mechanism also contains an enzyme that helps the awn propagate by burrowing into its host. Continue…